Jump to content
đź’¬ Smartcat Community
Otávio Banffy

Identifying your "Personal Productivity Style"

Personal Productivity Style  

1 member has voted

  1. 1. Which productivity style you identify yourself with the most?

    • The Prioritizer
      0
    • The Planner
      0
    • The Visualizer
      1
    • The Arranger
      0


Recommended Posts

I found this post that touched upon an interesting idea. Everyone has a personal productivity style, and you can benefit from enforcing it on your work. I was hoping for a sort of test or quiz to help you identify your own style, but turns out they only describe it to you.

Still, I found it interesting enough to share it around here. Maybe we can make a pool and see where people fit in the most. :)

Without further ado, here are the descriptions:

Quote

1. The “Prioritizer”

People that gravitate to analytical, critical, realistic and fact-based thinking are priortizers. They are more concerned about increasing productivity level by measuring how long it would take to complete certain tasks based on the time they have. The priotizers are not into chit-chat and rarely share too much personal information. Their emails are brief and straight to the point. Priotizers contribute to problem-solving through logical and critical analysis, decisiveness, goal orientation, consistency and data analysis.

2. The “Planner”

The planner is the team members that immerse themselves in project details and project-planning using the calendar and other tools. They are always involved in organized, planned, detailed and sequential thinking. Planners are not a party to time-wasting at meetings with no action plans and no focus; thrive on schedules and actions. They are willing to risk missing out on creative endeavors and opportunities. Emails from planners are always detailed and clearly stated with bullet points. Planners are contributive in practicality and action orientation, they are instrumental in achieving effective data/project plans, and play a significant role in perfect planning by finding overlook flaws.

3. The “Visualizer”

If you are always focusing on the bigger picture and broad concepts, then you’re likely a visualizer. They are prefer synthesized, integrated, holistic and intuitive thinking, they perform very well under pressure and bored easily when there are fewer projects to work on. Visualizers are not interested in looking into details most time, they rely on possibilities. They are individuals with an excess passion for breakthrough ideas, hence, can lead such projects. Their emails are mostly long as they are filled with ideas and concepts. Visualizers are very good in problem-solving, innovation; integration of new concepts for change, and recognizing new opportunities.

4. The “Arranger”

Arrangers are the set of workers that prefer expressive, emotional and supportive thinking. They perform better at work collaborating with their colleagues to get work done. They are not fans of individuals that rely too much on data and are fond of chatting online. They enjoy love stories, expressing concern, making eye contacts and would send emails copying a lot of people. Arrangers can contribute effectively in marketing ideas, proper evaluation of underlying emotions, and facilitating team interaction.

5

As the source itself mentions, you may feel you have traits from two of them or perhaps all of them. I'd say it's possible you change your style depending on which kind of work you do, too.

I definitely identify myself the most with the Visualizer. Which one do you identify yourself with? Vote on the pool.

Now, I realize that this was made thinking on team environment... However, not just interesting, it can help you think of ways to better interact with clients or translation teams you get to work with. Also, how your own ways of thinking influence your actions. So be conscious. :)

These styles were inspired on a book, called Work Simply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×