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Virginia Monti

Useful resources for Spanish

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Let’s share a list of useful resources for Spanish, shall we? :) These are the ones I use the most:

  • RAE's reference corpora. This comprises¬†CREA (Corpus de Referencia del Espa√Īol Actual),¬†CORDE (Corpus Diacr√≥nico del Espa√Īol),¬†CDH (Corpus del Diccionario Hist√≥rico del Espa√Īol) and¬†CORPES XXI (Corpus del Espa√Īol del Siglo XXI). Very useful for word collocations, variety in structure, vocabulary, etc.
  • Fund√©u (Fundaci√≥n del Espa√Īol Urgente). You can see FAQ about Spanish and also send queries. You get your answer right away. You can also subscribe with your email address and receive a recommendation in your mailbox every day.
  • If you translate creative content, you'll find this Dictionary of rhymes very useful.
  • Diccionario de las preposiciones espa√Īolas (Alicia Mar√≠a Zorilla) (Available in pdf)
  • Diccionario de dudas y dificultades de la lengua espa√Īola (Manuel Seco) (Available in pdf)

What about you? Can you add some more?

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Hello!

I'm adding to this thread a very interesting resource that was shared with me recently.

It's the Diccionario de anglicismos del espa√Īol estadounidense,¬†by¬†Instituto Cervantes at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University. It compiles terms derived from Spanish spoken in the United States and it provides information (descriptive, not prescriptive) of their social, geographical and stylistic uses.

You can find already well-known and widely-used terms like "chequear/checar," but then you also get unexpected entries (at least for me), such as:

aguaquear [a.gua.ke.'ar; a.gua.'kiar] v. (<ing. to
awake) Dejar de dormir; despertarse. Ej.: ¬ęno
hay forma de aguaquear al ni√Īo¬Ľ. Geo.: EU: PF.
Soc.: Pop. Reg.: Col. Alternativas: despertarse.
→ aguakear, awakear.  

aiscrin ['ais.krin] m. (<ing. ice cream) Helado.
Ej.: ¬ęme gusta el aiscrin de fresa¬Ľ. Geo.: EU: G.
Soc.: Pop. Reg.: Col. Alternativas: helado, nieve.
→ áiscrim, aiscrín, aiscrinero.

It only takes two examples like the ones above to make you stop doubting language is a living organism. :51_scream: :P

Enjoy!

 

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I've long been a fan of using corpora for usage analysis and comparisons, so I feel obligated to share http://www.corpusdelespanol.org/.  You'll see a few options of corpora to use there, the newest stand-alone ES corpus (number 2) titled "Web/Dialects" is quite extensive, and the interface is very easy to learn and use. The older one (number 1) is smaller but is great for historical trends and genre.

Here's a comparison of this corpus vs CREA: https://www.corpusdelespanol.org/compare_corpes.asp

You can use it without registering, registering (free) gets you up to 50 queries a day, if you think you'll do more than that, the licenses are very reasonably priced. Within the site you can also find access to EN corpora, N-gram viewers, etc. 

 

 

 

 

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Wow, very comprehensive list, @Virginia Monti! Thanks!

I can't think of anything else. I'll just add that Fundéu is especially useful if you are working with relatively new terms, like tech or social media vocabulary. It takes a while for terms to officially "settle" and get into the RAE (Royal Spanish Academy) dictionary so they do their best to provide some sort of standard (sometimes these are just recommendations).

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Great topic, @Virginia Monti. I appreciate the pdf dictionaries you mentioned, as I didn't have them. 

I think it also depends on your specialization what you may find useful. There are a lot of online glossaries in different specializations. 

Here's one for legal http://web.juringles.es/glosario/ingles-espanol.

I use a lot the Proz.com term search as it usually has the terms I need. I find Linguee.com and Wordreference.com good resources as well. 

I love Fundeu and I've asked them a couple of questions via Twitter which they replied in a flash.

Also, check this list http://traduccionjuridica.es/bibliografia-y-recursos-sobre-traduccion-juridica/

Edited by xahntra
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38 minutes ago, Becky said:

I'll just add that Fundéu is especially useful if you are working with relatively new terms, like tech or social media vocabulary.

This is so true, @Becky!

18 minutes ago, xahntra said:

There are a lot of online glossaries in different specializations. 

Thanks for you additions, @xahntra! Do you specialize in legal translations? It'd be interesting to start a new topic with useful resources in this field. ;)

22 minutes ago, xahntra said:

This one looks like a gold mine, indeed!

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@Virginia Monti, I specialize in legal and financial translations, however, since I have a degree in Hospitality Management, I offer Travel/Tourism/Hospitality translations because my degree backs me up. For legal I've been taking online courses and practicing a lot; in regards to financial translation, I've always loved the subject, took several courses while at university and I've been taking online courses and practicing as well. 

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Hey, @xahntra! Here's the procedure to use CREA:

1) Insert the term in the field Consulta. You can then choose your filters (this is optional).

2) This allows you to filter by media. Notice you can even filter written sources and get only examples from the oral corpora (how awsome is this, huh?)

3) This allows you to filter by region.

4) Last, you can filter by topic.

5) Then, you clic Buscar. You'll be taken to another screen.

6) Here you can see how many results you obtained. In this screen you'll be able to indicate how you want to see your results.

7) You can choose to see either cases or documents.

8) You can indicate if want to see the full version or a summary and if you want to see concordances, paragraphs, etc. 

9) Then, you clic Recuperar. Now, you'll see the results in a different screen.

10) Here you see the criteria you chose to see the results. You can make further changes if you wish.

11) These are your results. 

12) Here you see information of the source (year, author, title).

13) You can clic here to go to the next results page.

For this example I didn't apply any filter. If you're looking for something more specific, of course you're going to get fewer results.

Hope you find this useful!

Screenshot 1.gif

Screenshot 2.gif

Screenshot 3.gif

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Wow, @Virginia Monti!!! Thank you for that! It will be very useful not just for me but for everyone using this resource and similar corpora.

Now I know why I wasn't getting any results (actually, just one): I wrote "instrospección", LOL.

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Amazing! I've never heard these terms either, but it just goes to show how malleable language is and how significant cultural context is in its evolution.

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8 hours ago, Virginia Monti said:

aiscrin ['ais.krin] m. (<ing. ice cream) Helado.

I can't stand this. 

"Que tal hermano, por favor me das un aiscrin de chocolate. Gracias"

(:

On another topic, what an amazing way to explain how to use CREA. This is the first time I read this post and I'm impressed with the quality and value of the tools.

Thank you so much, @Virginia Monti!

Edited by Joshua Velasquez
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10 hours ago, Joshua Velasquez said:

I can't stand this. 

"Que tal hermano, por favor me das un aiscrin de chocolate. Gracias"

I know, I know.

But here's the thing... there's a reality... you either deny it... or you compile a dictionary. :P

10 hours ago, Joshua Velasquez said:

This is the first time I read this post and I'm impressed with the quality and value of the tools.

Hope you find them useful!

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