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Found 2 results

  1. Hello everyone, The Lingua File has published yet another set of practices for people to learn more and better their favorite languages, and they are good suggestions. Without further ado, here are their suggestions: I believe Brandon (the author) nailed down a few concepts. Reading does help in remembering things, but writing them down is an even stronger way of doing so. I'm not certain about the technicalities of it, but I believe it is due to you associating movement, with visuals, muscle memory and having to make a creative effort (to generate something new). Personal examples are something I never thought about before, but they are right to say that personal history when associated with something makes it easier to remember it. The "new way of storing information" is also an interesting idea. You see, people have different senses that they connect with better than others. By far the most common affinity is with sight, second being hearing I believe... But there are affinities for all senses, a combination of them, and even no senses at all (sometimes it's about emotions). Knowing your own affinity can help you work better on designing your learning methods. Finally, having fun is one of the greatest ways of storing information, no matter what form it takes. Movies, friends, games, do whatever is best for you, but if you are dreading your next language learning session then it's definitely not gonna be very productive. But be engaged in it, looking forward to the next challenge, and it will be a breeze. Let us know if any of this helped at any moment!
  2. Question for American English natives, probably. There's a saying "call a spade a spade" that means to speak candidly or bluntly. Only recently, after reading Delany's Dhalgren, I've became aware that "spade" is a (derogative) term for a person of colour. As I understand, this saying about correct nomenclature for horticultural tools now has some amount of retrospective abusive connotation, if I may say so. Question is: how inappropriate this saying is now? That is, if I meet it in a modern text (dunno, in a character's speech or something), should it be considered a racial slur? Other question: why? What's the association between a spade (shovel, whatever) and 'not white'?? @lucy @lwennerstrom @Peter @Frank Nielsen