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Found 4 results

  1. Expanding on the post from two days ago on online courses, I wanted to show this small yet quite accurate image on preparing and translating an online course. Frankly I haven't had much contact with companies that use e-learning to train their employees, but the internet is surely filled with groups for a global audience, ranging from YouTube to MOOC platforms such as Coursera, edX and others. Step 1 and 3 might be outside of your responsibilities. These are often things that the creators themselves have to worry about. That infographic is mostly for creators anyway. Still interesting for translators, especially in what relates to text expansion and special characters. I naturally compared these considerations to gaming and it's quite fitting as well. Text expansion is a technique that has been used millennially in certain kinds of games, especially in the translation of JRPGs, and it's something every translator needs to worry about. And they are not limited to online courses and gaming either. These considerations can be taken into manuals, encyclopedias, catalogues, videos and more. If you have the chance to influence a content's creation to the point of orienting the design, or designing something yourself in a localization process, you can keep them in mind. Let me know whether you'd like to see some more thorough materials in that regard. They do have an eBook on that same page. It's mostly conceptual information, introductory, but it does have some interesting remarks if you want to get more involved.
  2. Personally, I don't like curricula anymore. I've swapped my CV for a Service Offer some time ago and it has worked much better. At least in the realm of translations. My opinions it that a CV is made so you can sell yourself to someone else. They want to hire you, you give them your CV. On a translation project what people are looking for isn't so much the person as it is the result. The result they want is their project properly translated. It's not as important where you studied, who you worked with, how well optimized your CV is, all it matters is whether you are capable of handling the job the right way, and whether the client recognizes that or not. The recognition of your capability may come in many ways. With direct clients, that's often a budding relationship. With agencies, they'd either want a test or they'll want to sort you in some way... meaning your CV, most likely. So one way or another, it's not harmful to have a CV. You may be freelancing today, but tomorrow you may decide to work full-time on a wonderful opportunity you found that 100% matches with you. Or you really want to conquer a client's heart, but that client is so rigged on the CV style that he needs to see a CV to understand you. Therefore, it's good to have it ready. I found this neat collection, an ebook of 37 pages dedicated to helping translators craft a well-performing CV. You can find it here. It's an ebook by Marta Stelmaszak, and I've covered a post from her before. There is a checkout process to get the ebook, which will require some personal information, but despite that the ebook is free and will be sent immediately after the sign up process. To my surprise, Marta shared a quite similar opinion of my own on the book, and had very similar arguments as to why have a CV no matter what. The book is filled with objectives for you to work at throughout the reading and has wonderful advice, including to craft a CV for each different type of client. It gives a detailed look of each section in a CV, and seems very up to date. If you haven't built your CV, or you're not satisfied with the one you've got, this is definitely a source to investigate. Get the book here.
  3. Today I'm bringing you a very small post by Will Procter. It's very to the point and it's basically an exposition of a few things localizers and content creators can miss when setting up the translation process of an online course. Having started my translation career translating online courses, this was an interesting read. If you know some online courses platforms you may also know that plenty of them have translation programs within them. The entire thing is interesting even if you are not much into MOOCSs (Massive Online Open Course(s)). Further on, he also mentions Connotation, Corporate Tone, and Consistency. It's a one minute read, so go take a look even if you are not that into this topic. Most of what he said is taken for granted. It's part of our routine, really, but I figured the context was interesting enough to promote it. Also, I might be talking about online courses some more in the coming days. Stay tuned.
  4. Freelancer Jan, DE-EN, EN-DE

    Hi, my name is Jan, I am a freelance translator from Berlin/Germany. I also went to school in the US and spent two semesters at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia. I have worked for auditing and tax advisory firms and legal firms, but also helped with website localization and know my way around a backend. My latest project is translating a children's book. Apart from translation, I have experience in proofreading, 10 years as a student at an auditing firm and have read multiple theses both in English and in German. Contact me at jan@mueller-reichenwallner.de Have a great day!
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