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Virginia Monti

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Virginia Monti last won the day on November 9 2017

Virginia Monti had the most liked content!

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About Virginia Monti

  • Rank
    Senior Translator EN-ES
  • Birthday 12/31/82
  1. Revision of translation tests

    Thanks for the valuable information, Sergey and Marilin! This is huge help for me.
  2. Hello! If there's anyone here working as a translation tests reviewer, I'd appreciate your input on the following: - Do you charge per word or by the hour? - If charging by the hour, what's the cost in relation to your regular translation fee? - How long does it take, on average, to correct and comment on a 300-word poor quality translation? Thanks!
  3. Quality Management

    Hi Una, I had a similar offer 3 months ago and I decided to give it a try, so I've been QAing full-time for the last two months. In my case, either proofing or editing the translated text is completely out of scope, in fact I sometimes get documents in other languages than my own pair. I've been QAing texts in Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Haitian Creole, Bengali and French, apart from Spanish and English. Basically, what you're asked to do is to compare source and target and make sure the format matches, that is, bold, italics, paragraph division, indentation, images in the right place, no mistakes in numbers, proper names, etc. Since I'm working with healthcare documents, I also have guidelines to follow, a checklist with indications of what phone numbers should look like, the use of punctuation in bulleted lists (you might have to learn a bit of how punctuation is used in other languages), if health plan names should be translated or not, etc. Also, when working with .doc files, I have to deliver both a trackchanged and a clean file. If working with pdf files, I just insert comments. As to the volume of words you can QA in an hour, it depends on whether the file is text only or if it's heavily formatted, with images, logos, charts, graphs and tables with numbers, etc. To cut a long story short, it is a somewhat mechanic, repetitive and boring job, one that I would definitely not do forever. Plus, it's highly draining for the eyes. Fortunately, I'll be done in a few weeks. The only reason I took the job was because it was temporary and the pay they offered was good. If you decide to give it a try, my advice is not to dedicate it more than 4-5 a day, and, it goes without saying, to make sure the pay works for you. If nothing else, it'll be at least a bit of a change from the translation routine. Good luck!
  4. To filter into policy

    Hi Noelia, I really like the version you came up with finally. Definitely the best one. If only clients could witness all the research and sweat invested into a single sentence or idea to make it sound good! Hahaha Good job!
  5. To filter into policy

    Hi Noelia! In my opinion, your translation is correct. Here's another suggestion: Las investigaciones que indican la posibilidad de que la hipótesis de la maldición de los recursos no se sostenga son tan recientes que no creo que hayan podido aún influenciar las políticas. Aunque es cierto que algunas economías han aprovechado sus recursos y se han beneficiado de ellos desde que comenzaron a extraerlos. You don't need that comma before que no creo... Hope you find it useful!
  6. Cyclicality

    Hi Noelia! Given the evidence you've found, I believe you can safely use ciclicidad in your translation. Moreover, the Fundeu also considers this is a well formed word in Spanish. Good luck!
  7. Jajo the rabbit interpreter

    I don't see anything wrong in this. I would've also hired Jajo as an interpreter... for his fluffiness and for having such cute short legs.
  8. Smartcat treasures found around the world

    You know your city
  9. Smartcat treasures found around the world

    Hey, Daniel! Nice to meet you, and good to know there's another rosarino around. That's Pellegrini Avenue on the picture.
  10. Smartcat treasures found around the world

    Nature is wise. It makes trees Smart. (2017 Spring season in Rosario, Argentina)
  11. Graffiti as a language

    Indeed. It's amazing how graffitis allow both citizens and first-time visitors to measure the pulse of a city. One can find out about social unrest, past beloved/present infamous leaders or even leaders to be, just by looking at walls. You can also obtain insight into popular wisdom, views on women, men, love, football, art. Cities are eloquent through their walls. They tell us about history, and clean walls are walls without memory. I dare say good part of the history and ideas of Latin American cities is still recorded on their walls. So, going back to the question, can graffitis be considered language? My answer would be yes, and even more. Worth translating? No doubt.
  12. A 1982 manifesto: With the tacit consent of ladies and gents, I’d like to comment on a bright-line distinction: being not a Yukon Gold, but a couch potato, is my long-term ambition. Neighbors might miss the backstory and become defamatory. It could well be transitory. If not, I’ll stick to the mind frame amid the furore. I’m no road warrior, you see. A food secure house is my plea. If pizza round the corner is no good, I can settle with transgenic food. Neither fame, nor glory… just tiramisu with mascarpone. You’ll never see me break-dancing, but you might catch me freelancing. Home-theatre I need not. Just TV-set in cozy spot. A party animal? A B-Boy? Oh, no. An oblomovian soul, procrastinating, and getting lost in abstract thought. 1982 I came into this world, which you can infer from the bolded words. It was a year of joy and jolly. If you don’t trust me, ask our Chilean colleague Before you come to a conclusion, allow me a final allusion. If you are to judge a potato, don’t be harsh, look deep into its heart: “Tubercles are creatures with feelings who find leisure appealing.”
  13. Good point, Julia. Indeed, when I finished reading the article the first question that came to my mind was whether the UN and organizations of the sort, which make heavy use of interpreters, were ever going to adopt this technology in the long run. And even though I dare say they won't completely replace human interpreters, we shouldn't forget how much MT has improved since it was first developed. And look at us translators now, making use of MT. Maybe in the long-term (not so long, mind you) interpreters will end up using these buddies to ease their burden. Finally, I don't think saying they have the potential of changing the way we communicate globally is an overstatement... for a start, we won't be able to use the expression "it's all Greek to me" anymore.
  14. How did you end up being a translator?

    As a little girl “a translator” was not the answer I’d give whenever someone asked what I wanted to become in the future. Instead, I’d say “an archaeologist, an astronaut a lawyer and a ballet dancer”. And I was absolutely convinced I could become all of them. Ah, innocence! Growing up, I developed a passion for reading and languages in general. I started learning English when I was 8 years old. By the time I was finishing secondary school, I knew I wanted to pursue a career connected to English or language. So, I enrolled in the English Teaching Training College and completed my first year. Even though I still liked English, I was not sure I wanted to become a teacher. The following year I signed up for the Literary and Technical Translation Course of Study. I completed both degrees simultaneously and then worked as a teacher for 4 years. At the same time, I’d take random jobs as a freelance translator, but eventually realized this was what I enjoyed the most and what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. Indeed, this is what I’ve been doing for the last 9 years and I don’t regret my decision a bit. I’ve met interesting people from all over the world and learned from them with every single conversation, exchange and task shared. Being a profession in which you need to learn new things constantly, makes it both challenging and rewarding. Happy Translation Day to you all!
  15. BnB (Bed and Breakfast)

    Hi Noelia! That makes perfect sense. Good luck with your work!
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