Jump to content
đź’¬ Smartcat Community

Otávio Banffy

Supermoderator
  • Content count

    367
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    37

Otávio Banffy last won the day on January 16

Otávio Banffy had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

516 Excellent

About Otávio Banffy

  • Rank
    Senior Game Localizer EN-PT(BR)
  1. Amit Agarwal at digital inspiration presents to us Voice Dictation 2.0, a speech to text online application with recognition for a few dozen languages, including German, English, Portuguese, Italian, French, Spanish, Russian, Japanese and Chinese, with lots of variants. I've experimented with it for a while and boy, it works wonders. It's very fast, it's very precise, you can talk with moody voices and it still manages to recognize what you're saying. We previously had conversations about how tools such as this one can help you increase your productivity, and this is one of the opportunities to try that out. Using Smartcat, it does bring the inconvenience of having to copy and paste the material into the editor. But it can be good for making extensive translations of paragraphs, especially if you can join segments up. Actually, it seems like it can type stuff for you even if you are working on another tab. Worth experimenting with. It also has some voice commands (that only failed me once). It also has the amazing feature of being able to transcribe recordings. That ought to be very useful, though I haven't tested it yet. It happens to have text-to-speech capabilities as well. When I was younger, I remember playing with my family with voice recognition software, and laughing over the ludicrous things it would come up with. Now, there is no longer that possibility. Check it out here.
  2. Nice to see you guys expanding the game! Good luck.
  3. Considerations on gender-neutral language

    You can also use generic terms such as "people", "employees", "workers", "a person", etc. to keep things varied from the mere "they".
  4. I've briefly touched upon the idea that language has power to influence our thoughts in some of my previous shares before. By the way, thanks @Becky for adding her own share. Today, I've found numerous articles that spoke of this very idea. One of them, the one I'm going to be referencing here now, tells us how language has the power to influence social statuses, opinions, your feelings, and mostly the norms. It's called "Why you should use gender-neutral language in the workplace" and I quite enjoyed reading through it. While it does have an initial focus on the work environment, it touches on numerous other grounds. I found these extremely useful. Most people wouldn't glimpse over that, but if you can keep this consideration in mind you can help your clients to achieve a more friendly corporate personality in your translations. They may even be worried about such things themselves and you can help hem achieve neutrality with your suggestions in their source material as well. That's yet another important consideration worthy to keep in mind during translations. That's something I've noticed and spoke of before in our Senior conversations at the forum. The words chosen for a job ad can make a considerable difference in finding the right candidates. Much like that, it can also lead people away from it with the wrong use of words, and that applies to different genders as well. A great parting message. This is something we need to keep in mind on our translations, especially leading with materials for a global audience. It can be life-defining for corporate entities, and you can be responsible for making people feel included. I've also found similar stories that I won't be separately sharing but which are related, such as how cartoon Villains speaks in foreign accents and the sinful language of food in the industry, and they might interesting for you.
  5. I've recently found this amazing wiki website called TVTropes, and they have all sorts of great references (from medias other than television as well), and they have a nice collection of tropes from games. Their definition of trope, by the way: In a wiki page called "Good Bad Translations" they give us various examples of poor translations that had funny outcomes, often became memes, or strong references for the players and developers involved. Samurai Shodown - Apparently, the title was made like that on purpose to reference another title. Still, it looks bad. TVTropes has a vortex of inner links that will drag you further than YouTube's recommended videos. Quite a few interesting things to read!
  6. Do you call yourself a freelancer?

    That's a very good point to discuss. Hum... Typically I haven't had any problems calling myself a freelancer. It does carry some misconceptions depending on where you are at and who you're talking to though. In some countries the freelancing style is quite common and widespread, people don't have difficulties understanding the lifestyle or workflow. In others, being a freelancer is indeed the very same thing as being a homeless person looking for the next small gig that will keep them alive for the day. It's unfortunate, but this perception exists because these people do exist. There are people who decided to do freelancing (not just with translations, with pretty much any kind of service), but they don't know the means to disseminate their work, so much so that they diversify what they do enough to always be doing something but never be doing what they do for real. And it's a sad condition, in my opinion, unless the person somehow lives comfortably and happily like that. In these scenarios, I believe there is nothing wrong with calling yourself a professional translator or a translation business owner instead. It's not only true, it does have an air of "officiality" to it, which makes it look more stable, and therefore more trustworthy, which should in turn get more confidence into the potential clients. And it stops people around you from thinking you are a vagabond, which admittedly, can happen depending on who those people around you are... I don't feel restrained when using the word Freelancer, but I do advertise myself often simply as a Translator. That does the trick. Until I have to explain what a translator does. ^^
  7. 4 communication tips for gaining customer trust

    Nice examples, Jane. Thanks!
  8. Expanding on the post from two days ago on online courses, I wanted to show this small yet quite accurate image on preparing and translating an online course. Frankly I haven't had much contact with companies that use e-learning to train their employees, but the internet is surely filled with groups for a global audience, ranging from YouTube to MOOC platforms such as Coursera, edX and others. Step 1 and 3 might be outside of your responsibilities. These are often things that the creators themselves have to worry about. That infographic is mostly for creators anyway. Still interesting for translators, especially in what relates to text expansion and special characters. I naturally compared these considerations to gaming and it's quite fitting as well. Text expansion is a technique that has been used millennially in certain kinds of games, especially in the translation of JRPGs, and it's something every translator needs to worry about. And they are not limited to online courses and gaming either. These considerations can be taken into manuals, encyclopedias, catalogues, videos and more. If you have the chance to influence a content's creation to the point of orienting the design, or designing something yourself in a localization process, you can keep them in mind. Let me know whether you'd like to see some more thorough materials in that regard. They do have an eBook on that same page. It's mostly conceptual information, introductory, but it does have some interesting remarks if you want to get more involved.
  9. Today I'm bringing you a very small post by Will Procter. It's very to the point and it's basically an exposition of a few things localizers and content creators can miss when setting up the translation process of an online course. Having started my translation career translating online courses, this was an interesting read. If you know some online courses platforms you may also know that plenty of them have translation programs within them. The entire thing is interesting even if you are not much into MOOCSs (Massive Online Open Course(s)). Further on, he also mentions Connotation, Corporate Tone, and Consistency. It's a one minute read, so go take a look even if you are not that into this topic. Most of what he said is taken for granted. It's part of our routine, really, but I figured the context was interesting enough to promote it. Also, I might be talking about online courses some more in the coming days. Stay tuned.
  10. Crafting a functional translation CV

    You're welcome!
  11. Personally, I don't like curricula anymore. I've swapped my CV for a Service Offer some time ago and it has worked much better. At least in the realm of translations. My opinions it that a CV is made so you can sell yourself to someone else. They want to hire you, you give them your CV. On a translation project what people are looking for isn't so much the person as it is the result. The result they want is their project properly translated. It's not as important where you studied, who you worked with, how well optimized your CV is, all it matters is whether you are capable of handling the job the right way, and whether the client recognizes that or not. The recognition of your capability may come in many ways. With direct clients, that's often a budding relationship. With agencies, they'd either want a test or they'll want to sort you in some way... meaning your CV, most likely. So one way or another, it's not harmful to have a CV. You may be freelancing today, but tomorrow you may decide to work full-time on a wonderful opportunity you found that 100% matches with you. Or you really want to conquer a client's heart, but that client is so rigged on the CV style that he needs to see a CV to understand you. Therefore, it's good to have it ready. I found this neat collection, an ebook of 37 pages dedicated to helping translators craft a well-performing CV. You can find it here. It's an ebook by Marta Stelmaszak, and I've covered a post from her before. There is a checkout process to get the ebook, which will require some personal information, but despite that the ebook is free and will be sent immediately after the sign up process. To my surprise, Marta shared a quite similar opinion of my own on the book, and had very similar arguments as to why have a CV no matter what. The book is filled with objectives for you to work at throughout the reading and has wonderful advice, including to craft a CV for each different type of client. It gives a detailed look of each section in a CV, and seems very up to date. If you haven't built your CV, or you're not satisfied with the one you've got, this is definitely a source to investigate. Get the book here.
  12. On the first Funny Friday of the year I'm bringing you something you probably would not expect in a few decades of translation news. When I was exploring how content creators decide what to do on their videos I had an idea: to take a few cutscenes from a movie, or a video game, or whatever, and subtitle it (or dub it) with something similar but entirely nonsensical. Then I recently came to know this amazing channel on YouTube which does exactly that. They are called Bad Lip Reading, and they are very creative. In homage to the new and terrible Star Wars movie, here's a sample: Do you know why Han never trusts birds? Yoda taught him.
  13. Words without borders brings us a quite neat interview with Ilan Stavans, publisher of Restless Books and their imprint for children's and young adults (YA), Yonder. We've covered the translation of children books before from the translator point of view, now we're showing the publisher's one. The interview covers a few different and interesting topics. Here are some of the questions being asked: And a veritable quote here: You can read the full interview here. It's quite interesting, indeed. I hope that got you inspired with it today! Let me know your thoughts below.
  14. Today I'm bringing something relatively different from other posts I shared. I want to connect you with an interesting blog post from Financial Translation. It's about a conversation between two players of the translation industry in different levels and scales. One of them is Miguel Llorens, a highly specialized translator in finances, and the other is Renato Beninatto, a highly respected localization expert, now more businessman than translator. The two had considerably different views on the common practices of larger agencies, and that was the main topic for discussion. Here are some snippets from the post: Down here we can notice some mentions that are likely references to other things Mr. Llorens talks about in his blog. Still, one can understand his points. Now in here we get some interesting mentions about output. Most people would be quite shocked at it: To me, personally, I'm faster typing than speaking out loud. But hey, ought to be something to try out. Something stood out for me in the whole conversation, too: I find that all too common these days, particularly with agencies. The rest of the conversation take many turns and touches on numerous subjects. It's was interesting to read about their chat and it gave me quite a few things to think about. Maybe it will for you too. What do you think? What jumped to your attention in the story? Tell us below.
  15. Patrik Dholakiya wrote an article on Entrepreneur talking about techniques for building trust with your customer. While aimed at companies, its tips does have meaningfulness with freelancers as well. After all, freelancers are but a solo company. There's a good chance that you've already faced at least one situation in which a client needed your immediate attention on a weekend, a holiday, your regular day off or even after your work hours. While you can't make place work over all your life priorities, it does pay off to be accessible and take a few minutes of your day to be connected (if you can, of course) and reply to queries, even if to just make people at ease. It can help you retain a client, help that new client build confidence in your capabilities, and even save a lot of headaches for your partners and clients without much effort on your part. People get impressed when they get a reply with a short period of time. A real, human, reply. In my opinion this is the best tip from the four, but there are some observations to it. Small talk isn't really a raport-building practice. You don't become a friend particularly because you asked them about the weather. By the way, that's a very old and often lame way of getting them annoyed. Most people don't care about the weather too much. What you need to do is show interest in their lives. Be curious about their business (not necessarily their family, or hobbies), be involved. Ask about their workflow (if it isn't something out of context or obvious already), provide value by hinting at techniques or solutions for their issues. Offer to help, take a step above everyone else. That builds rapport, interest in the other. Especially useful when you are talking to a new client for the first time, laying out the details of your work can do two things: Either breaking apart their confidence in you, or help improve it. Some clients are just looking for a quick solution. They don't want someone to write a novel about it, they want someone to fix it. Like when you call a repairman. You want him or her to fix the issue, not give you a 10-minute worth of reading over how he's going to fix the issue. However, when starting something new, when forming an agreement, when deciding how to tackle a project it's important that you have the details laid out for yourself, and getting access to that can make the client confident you are the right person for the job. So use your own judgement and experience with this. Being respectful is always important. Giving the options to the client won't always work, however. Just like in the repairman case, some clients want very little to do with the system, they don't want to make decisions, they want you to take them. Part of the reason why people go looking for agencies is because they don't want to decide things for themselves. Ironically, neither do most agencies. They just want to get their problems solved, so they hire people who can do the job and lay the responsibility on them if anything goes wrong. So, when you are not working with an agency, but with a direct client, and you know you have an open line of communication, use that line to provide him the choices he's meant to make if he doesn't expect you to make them yourself. As a translator you need to be able to figure most aspects for yourself, but some things are exclusive to the business being translated. That's it! Check out the full article if you want to read Pratik's reasoning and find useful and interesting links and tools you may use. Let me know your thoughts below.
×