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Otávio Banffy

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Otávio Banffy last won the day on September 13

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About Otávio Banffy

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    Senior Game Localizer EN-PT(BR)
  1. Top challenges translating in your pair

    Portuguese has an even more bureaucratic way of speaking and writing, depending on who you are, so English is somewhat fitting with it in this regard. What can be complicated when working to Brazilian Portuguese translations is that Brazil is a large country, and it has various states, each state with its own way of thinking and speaking. All of them follow a similar structure, but the choice of words and the momentum can vary considerably. When you are translating materials from enterprises, there is a generic tone of voice you can use no matter what. It speaks the common tongue in a semi-bureaucratic level with the use of some fanciness and some clarity. However, the best translations, the ones that really stand out and make a company feel unique and alive is to let the translator add his own (or the one he established for the company) tone of voice, which involves using modern expressions, a liberty in speech and word use, a naturalness instead of rigidly by the book. It can sound counter-intuitive to say that something which wasn't written in proper Portuguese would sound better to the audience than popular Portuguese, but it's exactly the opposite, in Brazil, specifically. A lot of people, and I mean a lot, are way more comfortable in reading and listening to a conversational tone from a serious and large company than its straight-and-narrow counterpart. The difference between them is similar to the use of common jargon and legal jargon in most languages. And when it comes to transcreation, or the translation of entertainment material, that difference is even more accentuated. The difficulty lies, for the translator, to find the proper tone of voice for each character and audience, and there is no hard rule... But the interesting part is: finding the right way of writing (rather, typing) Brazilian Portuguese.
  2. LocJAM4 - Main Discussion Thread

    The winners are out, and we've got amazing news!
  3. LocJAM4 — Game Localization Competition

    The LocJAM4 is over, and the winners were announced on the 28th of July. And... FOUR of our study group participants WERE THE WINNERS!!! Congratulations to RENAN FELIPE DOS SANTOS, our LocMage!! Congratulations to GABRIEL NINĂ”!! Congratulations to ROXANA IVETTE RIVERA MORENO!! Congratulations to SHAIMAA EL-SHAMY!! #YOUAREAWIN @Shaimaa El-Shamy @Roxana Rivera @Gabriel NinĂ´ @Renan Felipe dos Santos And congratulations to everyone else for having participated and shared your thoughts and experiences! :D I'm amazed, people. Really. Not a single study group in the whole world can say they managed to achieve that. We had FOUR participants from the study group as winners. That's no coincidence. We must all be very proud. This here: it worked. >: D And you guys, are awesome!
  4. Subtitling Questionnaire — Share your thoughts as a subtitler!

    Thanks for the recommendation Peter!
  5. Hey Christian, welcome to the community portal! Most of it has been covered by Vova already, but I wanted to point a few things out for your knowledge, in case you don't already know some of it: You'll be happy to know that there are a few differentiating statuses in the Smartcat marketplace. For instance, we have our Senior Translators, who have passed a rigorous test of peer assessment. There's another session coming up soon called Senior Blitz which will bring a few more of them, hopefully. Together with them, there are the Approved and Confirmed translators, who went through the same test, with different degrees of classification. Beyond that, Smartcat also offers the possibility to test translators through the Request a Team feature, ran by Olga herself, who replied above your post. Translators who have been approved in those tests based on specializations are then marked in the marketplace for their achievement (and ease of selection). Additionally, you can see how many projects a translator have already completed, and their rating from their respective clients, which are a good indication of professionalism, as well as the word count they have translated in the Smartcat Editor. The Senior Translators status fits well with your description of a smaller and reliable selection. Again, welcome to the forum! We have various interesting discussions over here, feel free to join in any of them.
  6. Subtitling Questionnaire — Share your thoughts as a subtitler!

    The ones I can add are: Amara Nikse Jubler YouTube Amara is a collaborative platform. Nikse is an online editor like Subtitle-Horse. Jubler I haven't gotten to know, properly. YouTube is minimalist, but it does have plenty of useful features, especially for people who have never done subtitling before. I also know that Smartling has a Translation management system which supports subtitling. I like their Smart name. They don't have a software for lone subtitlers to use, from what I gather, though.
  7. Subtitling Questionnaire — Share your thoughts as a subtitler!

    That's something I found on an online subtitle editor called Subtitle-Horse Your formatting feels cleaner, indeed! I should call the @Wordslinger to help load those bullets.
  8. Subtitling Questionnaire — Share your thoughts as a subtitler!

    Personal How long have you been working with subtitling? Little more than 24 months now. Do you have any formal education or training in subtitling? I do not. Do you believe it is necessary to have a formal education or training for learning the subtitling process and performing well? I don't think it is necessary, but I do believe that a little training, as little as a simple video tutorial and some guidelines, would go a long way in helping Do you work on a per word, per hour, or per recorded minute basis? I've always worked on a per word basis, but I believe a per hour approach is best in subtitling jobs. What is your understanding of the difference between Closed Captioning and Subtitling? From what I gather, closed captioning is meant for the deaf, hard of hearing and places where you can't play audio out loud, so it has the descriptions of the sounds being played, beyond lyrics and what people are saying. Subtitling is just what's said or written in the recording. Technology What would be a life-saving capability or technology in subtitling? Ah... Automatic insertion of frame gaps between subtitles, or voice-to-text recognition What are the most awesome features you’ve worked with on a subtitling software? Automatic synchronization, intuitive and noob-friendly time-code interfaces, subtitle preview and video speed configurations, and video loop at the selected time-code. Software What is the best subtitling software you worked with? Transifex. It was were I began, and it was very simple to use. Missed a bunch of features that I learned about later on, though. Do you have to use multiple softwares for performing your subtitling jobs? I did have to a couple of times, when a single software's features weren't enough to cover my needs. Mostly on synchronization, which was a one-time action, and then back to the main one. Have you used a software which can create subtitles from transcripts? (The written dialogue or descriptions into time coded subtitles) YouTube has that, I haven't played with it though. Clients How do you meet the clients looking for subtitles? Mostly, I am part of groups which have constant content being published, and that's where I made most of my subtitles, about 90%. What are your client’s main category of content? (Courses, News, Movies, etc.) Mostly online courses. Challenges What are the biggest challenges you face as a Subtitler? Whenever the audio quality is bad or the speaker has a strong accent or difficulty in saying certain words, and there's no transcript (or worse, the transcript is wrong [happens all the time]), I need to do some research until I find the right way to deal with it, and that's time-consuming, and sometimes even stressful. Another major challenge, in some circumstances, is keeping as faithful to the source as possible, since character and time limitations prevent you from doing so. You need to have a lot of tact for dealing with those situations. Have you had to transcribe videos before? Do you do it regularly? What are the challenges on that? I did, and more frequently than I'd hope to have. The challenge of it is the same as above: you need to do some research, and often play the recording's section over and over until you fully understand what's happening, and even then there are times in which you simply can't, not without some clarification. Have you ever had issues with synchronization? Yeah, plenty of times, actually. Thankfully, various softwares today have multiple synchronization and gap fixes. Do you struggle with verbalized pauses? (Filler words: Hmm, like, you know, right, etc.) At first, I did. It is a matter of learning the balance: you can't eliminate them completely, as that withdraws from the speaker's personality, and too much withdraws from the readability. The secret is adding just some of the fillers. Do you follow any specific guidelines when subtitling? As a matter of fact, when I don't have one specific for the job at hand, I do follow one. Netflix has an open guideline section of best practices when it comes to subtitling, and it works very well on pretty much every case I've found. What are the steps you take when preparing for a subtitling job? I like to hear or watch the recording first, then I like to get acquainted with the subject, if that's possible. If it is an established IP, I need to get knowledgeable about the universe and the characters, and previous translations. Once that's done, the subtitling process itself is quite similar to any other translation, save for each software's peculiarities. Would you perform subtitling jobs on Smartcat if it provided the right subtitling environment for you? Hell yeah baby. It would be perfect to imbue everything in one place.
  9. Hello everyone! Here's a small questionnaire for all of you, subtitlers and related professionals. We want to hear your opinion! Questions Personal How long have you been working with subtitling? Answer Do you have any formal education or training in subtitling? Answer Do you believe it is necessary to have a formal education or training for learning the subtitling process and performing well? Answer Do you work on a per word, per hour, or per recorded minute basis? Answer What is your understanding of the difference between Closed Captioning and Subtitling? Answer Technology What would be a life-saving capability or technology in subtitling? Answer What are the most awesome features you’ve worked with on a subtitling software? Answer Software What is the best subtitling software you worked with? Answer Do you have to use multiple softwares for performing your subtitling jobs? Answer Have you used a software which can create subtitles from transcripts? (The written dialogue or descriptions into time coded subtitles) Answer Clients How do you meet the clients looking for subtitles? Answer What are your client’s main category of content? (Courses, News, Movies, etc.) Answer Challenges What are the biggest challenges you face as a Subtitler? Answer Have you had to transcribe videos before? Do you do it regularly? What are the challenges on that? Answer Have you ever had issues with synchronization? Answer Do you struggle with verbalized pauses? (Filler words: Hmm, like, you know, right, etc.) Answer Do you follow any specific guidelines when subtitling? Answer What are the steps you take when preparing for a subtitling job? Answer Would you perform subtitling jobs on Smartcat if it provided the right subtitling environment for you? Answer Copy and paste the questions in your answer for ease of use. Thanks for participating!
  10. Translation Jokes

    What do you get when you submit an inattentive translator to a blood test? A Type-O. Select the answer above to find out. Proudly sponsored by: Virginia Monti
  11. Hey Maxim I don't have any specific format in mind, but I believe Success Stories are meant to inspire through a connection between a client's business (and/or material to be translated) and the case shown at hand. It is meant to get people to want what others already have, not to sell them things they don't. With this in mind, I'd follow a few pointers: Use a simple, conversational and direct language. Do mention technologies and features by their names, just don't over-rely on them. Don't try to sell Smártcat through the success story. Get people interested instead. It's very clear who is the problem solver. Make it shorter, perhaps? A 5-minute read would be a nice target, I believe. But that's all just my opinion! We can try different things and see what works best.
  12. That's a nice article, very targeted at new clients. Not everyone will be able to read English, and I believe this article might be a good candidate to be translated to different languages, but other than that, we'll keep it in mind.
  13. Smártcat treasures found around the world

    Hahahaha... Good one
  14. Copywriters on fire

    That looks... Weird What were they going for over there?
  15. Making a living from translation

    The advice I can give right now is this: If you haven't already made the leap from employee to freelancer, take it slowly. Do your research, learn what you can. Go part-time if possible before the transition. Be careful where you step. It's important to be dedicated no matter what you choose to do, but try and secure yourself so you don't get overwhelmed by the lack of income you may face at first. Doing translation can be very steady and profitable. But to some, especially those starting out, it can be the same as working as an actor, or a Voice Actor at that. You may get one great job one day, and then spend 3-8 months without work. So, establish yourself first. Once you are secured, you can decide whether you want to make the full transition into freelancing. Tip your toes in the water, first. It's definitely possible to live in both styles.
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